Posts Tagged ‘digitaljournal.com’

DigitalJournal.com launches website for Future of Media events

October 7th, 2010

futureofmediaevents.com

DigitalJournal.com’s popular speaker series called “Future of Media” now has an official home on the Web. DigitalJournal.com is happy to announce a new site, Futureofmediaevents.com, features relevant details on the growing event held in downtown Toronto.

The new website caters to fans, attendees, speakers and sponsors of Future of Media events. The site boasts full bios of all past speakers, such as Elmer Sotto from Facebook Canada and Rachel Nixon of CBC News, as well as video wrap-ups and summaries of past events.

“The Future of Media has become so popular we needed to create an online destination to alert readers about upcoming events while also collecting and publishing information about past events,” says Chris Hogg, CEO of DigitalJournal.com. “In addition to informing guests about the event, we’ll also be covering developments in new media and traditional news to keep everyone up-to-date with what’s happening in the world of news around them.”

Future of Media events take place in the evening and are free to the public. The events are held semi-annually and are broken into three parts: The events begin with a panel discussion, followed by a live Q&A, and they conclude with network opportunities for guests. For the panel portion, industry leaders and experts discuss a topic relating to where media is heading. Past topics have included citizen journalism, media business models and social media.

Future of Media events attract a wide variety of attendees, from media executives to developers to entrepreneurs to social media junkies. The past two events held at The Drake Hotel in downtown Toronto hit maximum capacity before the doors were even opened.

With its new website for the Future of Media events, DigitalJournal.com aims to inform those interested in media about what’s happening around them. In addition to having information about Future of Media events, the site boasts blog page that will discuss trends in journalism and new media.

In addition to FutureOfMediaEvents.com, users can also find info and event updates on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

The next Future of Media event is scheduled for March 2011, at a date and venue TBA.

‘Future of Media’ event examines impact of social media, mobile

September 10th, 2010
From left to right: DigitalJournal.com Managing Editor, David Silverberg; Anjali Kapoor, Managing Editor, Globe and Mail, Digital; and David Skok, Senior Producer of Online Content for Global News; Elmer Sotto, head of growth for Facebook Canada; social media expert Mark Evans; and Polar Mobile CEO, Kunal Gupta.

From left to right: DigitalJournal.com Managing Editor, David Silverberg; Anjali Kapoor, Managing Editor, Globe and Mail, Digital; and David Skok, Senior Producer of Online Content for Global News; Elmer Sotto, head of growth for Facebook Canada; social media expert Mark Evans; and Polar Mobile CEO, Kunal Gupta.

These were some of the discussion topics at the Future of Media 2010 panel discussion held in Toronto’s Drake Hotel, where a standing room-only crowd crammed into the Underground space to hear what panelists had to say about journalism’s prospects. The Future of Media event is hosted by DigitalJournal.com. It’s a regular event intended to bring a variety of experts together to discuss changes in the news industry, emerging trends and their impact on the media business.

The panel was made up of executives from a variety of companies: Elmer Sotto, head of growth at Facebook Canada; David Skok, Senior Producer of Online Content for Global News; digital marketing and social media strategist Mark Evans; Kunal Gupta, CEO of Polar Mobile; and The Globe and Mail’s Managing Editor, Digital, Anjali Kapoor.

The standing-room only event began with a discussion on the challenges facing mainstream media today. Despite the struggle to retain print readership, the digital era is ushering in a new variety of media consumer, the panelists agreed.

While the conversation focused primarily on social media and its influence on news, Evans stated strongly that content is still king, and many panelists agreed. “Content will still be king, not all the bells and whistles that comes with it”, said Kapoor, with Skok nodding in agreement. “Journalists should be great storytellers, no matter what,” Skok noted.

But where content is read is changing and will continue to evolve. Gupta from Polar Mobile says reading news on your smartphone should be the norm, if only media outlets invested more in implementing apps. “The growth in mobile users has blind-sided media companies. [Polar Mobile] has gone from one million to six million users,” he said.

Gupta also cited an intriguing statistic regarding content consumption, saying mobile users consume 100 pages of content per month on Time.com’s smartphone application compared to only 14 pages on Time.com’s website.

Evans countered Gupta’s statement, saying mobile isn’t yet catering to advertisers so its success as a news platform is still up in the air. Gupta responded by saying the mobile ad market is immature in Canada, so all we get now is that tiny banner ad across the screen. “The infrastructure needs to improve,” Gupta said.

Gupta also discussed how payment systems need to be simpler in the future in order for any kind of micropayment process to work effectively. He’s unsure when this will occur, but Gupta said he is certain news outlets would benefit from a more mature smartphone market.

The discussion then turned to what Google CEO Eric Schmidt recently said to the Atlantic Monthly: Newspapers will survive the digital revolution but expect news to be delivered on anything but paper.

Kapoor from the Globe & Mail responded by saying she sees print newspapers still appealing to news junkies; compelling content will continue to attract readers, it’s just a matter of complementing print stories with online add-ons, she said. Evans agreed, saying the growth of free dailies should demonstrate there is still demand for print.

When the talk turned to Facebook’s role in the media industry, Facebook Canada’s Sotto and Evans argued about the issue of the social network being a “walled garden.” Evans felt Facebook doesn’t offer a variety of ideas since people tend to read within an echo chamber. Sotto replied by saying you never know what you’ll find in your Facebook News Feed. He recalled clicking on links from a friend about country news in his feed, even though he never liked the music, “but I felt compelled to learn more about it.”

Kapoor noted the Globe & Mail enjoyed partnering with Facebook recently to bolster the Globe’s viewership. Sotto said the Globe saw an 81 percent increase in Facebook referral traffic when it implemented the Facebook “Like” button on the site.

Kapoor also said media outlets should get away from the idea of “we need to build everything ourselves.” She added, “The challenge is that news organizations shouldn’t be developing everything, they should be partnering. The online environment is a very different environment, and those skills aren’t always translated to traditional newsrooms.”

The panel also touched upon the issue of moderating comments. They wondered if online comments should be moderated in-house or outsourced. Evans believed this service should be outsourced because of cost, but some of the other panelists disagreed.

The panel was then asked about Twitter’s potential as a breaking-news source. Look at how the hostage crisis at the Discovery Channel building heaped praise on the micro-blogging service with headlines such as “Twitter breaks hostage story.” What happened to news outlets getting those scoops?

“Twitter is not a content creator,” Evans said. “It allows people to have conversations, to say what they want, but it’s not a news outlet. We have to remember that.”

Evans went on to say the difference between journalists and the public tweeting news they come across is storytelling. Laying out the facts and uncovering verifiable sources are skills media organizations still covet.

Speaking of skills, what talents should the next generation of journalists perfect in order to be attractive to news outlets? Kapoor said the Globe looks for journalists who can tell a good story and report effectively. She also said today’s journalists should also know more about SEO, analytics and knowing who the audience is, as well as social media and multimedia journalism.

“Be bold, experiment, that’s what we want to see,” Kapoor said.

Skok echoed her statement but stressed he would still like to see journalists hone the age-old skills of producing quality content. That said, Skok also supports using technology to tell stories in new ways. For example, Skok said his company gave every Global National reporter across Canada a new iPhone 4 with which to shoot video reports in addition to standard coverage.

When it comes to working at Facebook, Sotto likes to see risk-takers try new things. Some of their best ideas, such as photo tagging, came from all-night programming sessions when staff wanted to play around with brainstormed ideas, he said. Sotto also praised the University of Waterloo, where he said Facebook has discovered some of the best interns who went on to become employees.

After the panel discussion, the event moved to a Q&A where panelists took questions from the audience. One self-professed techie asked the panel what it thought about the future of radio and podcasts. Evans admitted he doesn’t listen to radio much, saying “podcasts are like the ugly orphan in the corner.”

Skok, on the other hand, thinks audio reports could be part of media’s future; during the G20 protests in Toronto, a Global reporter complemented her editorial with a voicemail add-on to a liveblog during a car fire. “She was terrified and you could hear it in her voice. It was the most compelling thing I have heard in years,” he said.

On Twitter, Digital Journal got a question via @annejoyce, who asked about social media’s popularity creating positions such as community managers at news outlets. Will these types of job openings continue to flourish or is it a passing fad?

Kapoor said the Globe isn’t consistent in how it handles this newly created position, considering how hazy the ROI has become in implementing a social media manager. It can also be difficult in measuring the success of someone involved in social media. “Do you base the qualification on traffic or Twitter mentions or something else?” she asked.

Evans answered Anne’s question bluntly. “Today, would you rather be a social media manager or a journalist? I’d go with social media, without a doubt.”

The Future of Media event was hosted by DigitalJournal.com and was sponsored by Suite 66, Queensway Audi and CNW Group. Prize sponsors included Rogers Wireless, Palm, Flip Video and Dell.

Facebook, media outlets discuss social media’s news revolution

August 17th, 2010

Social media has upended everything from how people find information to media organizations’ business models. Digital Journal talks to a few industry leaders on what this means for the future of media.

In media circles, the words “social media” are uttered almost as often as one would greet a co-worker in the morning, for good reason: It’s completely changed journalism, business models and strategies of news organizations.

According to comScore, almost 75 percent of global Web users access social media sites every month. When it comes to generating revenue, eMarketer says U.S. advertisers will spend $1.68 billion on social networking sites such as Facebook, MySpace and Twitter in 2010. That is a 20 percent jump over 2009 numbers.

And when it comes to journalism, many experts agree social media lets reporters have more frequent two-way communication with news consumers; it allows journalists to find more sources and real-time information; and it enables inexpensive live reporting for just about anyone.

“Social media has fundamentally changed the two most important aspects of traditional news, namely breaking news and commentary,” Jordan Banks, managing director of Facebook Canada, told DigitalJournal.com. “As a result, it is no longer sufficient just to provide the news. The expectation of the masses is now to be able to participate in the news, to share it, shape it, comment on it, define it and to use it as a tool to democratize the entire creation and dissemination process.”

Banks oversees Facebook’s Canadian operations and is responsible for leading and managing all commercial operations from the company’s Toronto-based office.

Previously, Banks was the managing partner at Thunder Road Capital which he founded in 2008 to provide investment and advisory services to early stage technology companies. Prior to that role he was the CEO of JumpTV and managing director of eBay Canada.

As a seasoned executive who has run the Canadian offices of a few Silicon Valley giants, Banks is widely respected and is an expert on social media’s impact on business. In one of his first major public events since taking over Facebook’s Canadian operations, Banks is set to appear on a five-person panel discussion at the Future of Media, an event taking place in Toronto on Sept. 8. The event is hosted by DigitalJournal.com and invites key executives, entrepreneurs, social media experts and journalists to comment on the future of media and engage in a Q&A with audience members.

“In a world where ‘social’ is the norm and expectation, all content — and news is no exception — will have to play by the rules of transparency, honesty and mass collaboration,” said Banks. With social media changing how, where and when people communicate, large news organizations are now adapting their business models and strategies to capitalize on an increasingly engaged audience.

“Media organizations need to look at social media as a distribution tool to get their content and brand to readers and users who may not be visiting their website, mobile site and applications,” Anjali Kapoor told DigitalJournal.com. Kapoor is the Managing Editor, Digital at The Globe and Mail. “The experience of a news user has also changed and more often than not, a news item might show up in a Facebook feed or Twitter feed first. It offers amazing potential and changes the way journalists need to think about their audience and their journalism.”

Kapoor oversees the editorial digital strategy for The Globe and Mail. She was also director of product and editorial at Yahoo! Canada where she was responsible for overseeing the product strategy and business goals of the Media Group. She will also be speaking at the Future of Media in Toronto on Sept. 8.

Kapoor says a social media plan and strategy is always an integral part of The Globe and Mail‘s coverage of various news stories. She says the Globe is using social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter to cover stories and cites a Toronto example: “Our coverage of the G20 Summit was a combination of traditional journalism and a live blog that incorporated real-time tweeting, photos and video from reporters, our readers and other blogs,” Kapoor said.

Print journalism is not the only medium to be affected by social media, either. As David Skok, Senior Producer of Online Content for Global News told DigitalJournal.com, broadcast media is also in the middle of undergoing massive change.

“The ivory tower approach of an anchor telling the audience what kind of day it’s been has been replaced by a collaborative and symbiotic relationship between the audience and the reporter,” Skok said. “On a consumption level, the audience now gets to decide what it wants, when it wants it. Whether through social graphs or geo-targeted hyper-local news, the audience that now determines what’s important to them and their friends, and not the news editor.”

Skok oversees the local and national digital properties under the GlobalNews.ca network. His career spans both the online and on-air worlds of news, and he’s pioneered many of Global News’ online and cross-platform efforts. Prior to that position, he worked with ABC News in Washington on its Nightline program, and with CHUM Radio in Toronto. Skok will also be speaking at the Future of Media in Toronto on Sept. 8.

“The ultimate purpose of journalism is to communicate with, and on behalf of, the audience,” said Skok. “As the audience changes the way it consumes news and information, it is vital that journalists reflect these changes both in their news-gathering and storytelling abilities. Ignoring the effect of social media on journalism is akin to turning your back on the audience you serve.”

Skok believes social media has greatly increased the transparency between news organizations and their audiences, which has improved relationships between the two. And while many news organizations have embraced social media in some way, Skok believes they are not utilizing new platforms to their fullest.

“Very few news organizations have a strong grasp of what each services’ strengths and weaknesses are, and how each can be effectively used as distribution and communication tools,” he said. “Social media isn’t just about communicating to your audience, it’s about sharing with and learning from them in a transparent and honest way. That’s a concept that I think most news organizations are still grappling with.”

For more info on social media and mobile platforms, don’t miss the Future of Media event in Toronto on Sept. 8. The event is hosted by DigitalJournal.com and it’s free to attend but space is limited. More info on the event can be found here.

Digital Journal announces ‘Future of Media’ Sept. 8 in Toronto

August 10th, 2010

Save the date: Sept 8, 2010 at the Drake Hotel, Toronto. Doors open at 7:30 p.m., event starts at 8 p.m.

Digital media news outlet DigitalJournal.com is proud to announce it will be hosting its annual discussion featuring some of the most influential leaders in Canadian media. We have invited leading executives from Facebook, the Globe & Mail, Global News and Polar Mobile.

Dubbed “The Future of Media,” the panel discussion will explore how media organizations are adapting to the Web, how social media has influenced journalism, and what the future holds for media professionals.

The event will take place Wednesday, September 8, 2010 at the Drake Hotel Underground (1150 Queen Street West) at 8 p.m. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. and admission is free and open to the public. Seating is limited and will be on a first-come, first-serve basis. The event will also be filmed and broadcast online after the event.

Topic & Discussion

The Future of Media 2010 is a must-see event for anyone interested in the rapidly changing landscape of new media, the Web and technology. The speakers will discuss some of the biggest challenges the mainstream media face today. Panelists will address how social and digital media are changing traditional media; why social services such as Facebook are increasingly being regarded as a discovery point for news; how real-time information is changing mainstream media and the role of mobile devices; and how changing media consumption habits offer a glimpse into the future of media.

The event will feature a live panel discussion followed by a Q&A session with the audience. Digital Journal will also be taking questions via Facebook and Twitter to pose to panelists. Questions may be submitted at any time between now and Sept. 8.

Speakers & Sponsors


DigitalJournal.com is happy to announce a star-studded, A-list group of media executives will make up the panel at this year’s Future of Media conference. The speakers are:

The Future of Media will be hosted and moderated by Digital Journal. The event is sponsored by Queensway Audi, Toronto’s number-one Audi dealer; Suite 66, Canada’s largest independent online advertising sales organization; Dell Canada; Rogers Wireless; Flip Video; and Palm.

Prizes

Sponsors of Digital Journal’s Future of Media event are also providing an impressive array of door prizes to be given away to attendees of the Future of Media event on Sept. 8 at the Drake Hotel in Toronto. The prizes are:

  • 1 person will take home a 32GB Wi-Fi + 3G Apple iPad, courtesy of Suite 66.
  • 1 person will take home a new Dell Studio 15 notebook with artist lid, courtesy of Dell Canada.
  • 5 guests will take home a high-definition Flip Ultra HD camcorder, courtesy of Flip Video.
  • 2 guests will take home a new Palm Pre, a Touchstone charger and leather case, courtesy of Palm. Wireless subscription not included.
  • 1 guest will take home a new Samsung Galaxy S Captivate, courtesy of Rogers Wireless. Wireless subscription not included.

Prizes are given away in a random draw at the end of the night, so you have to be there to win. For more info, interview opportunities or press passes to the event, contact David Silverberg or Chris Hogg online here.

RSVP to The Future of Media here.

Digital Journal announces Board of Advisers

January 19th, 2010

DigitalJournal.com made a big announcement today so I’m posting it here for all those interested:

Digital Journal, Inc., a leader in social news and citizen journalism, is pleased to announce the formation of a Board of Advisers.

The Board will provide expertise to the company’s management team to spearhead new initiatives to grow Digital Journal’s global media presence. The advisers are highly renowned experts in a range of fields, including new media, online journalism and venture capital.

DigitalJournal is a news network made up of more than 21,000 journalists, mainstream reporters and bloggers who report from 175 countries around the world.

“We’re very happy to have such an experienced and prolific group of individuals on our Board of Advisers,” says Chris Hogg, CEO of Digital Journal, Inc. “We’ve developed an international contributor base and readership, and we’re moving forward to develop new revenue channels and technologies. Along with our Board of Advisers, Digital Journal is poised for strong growth in 2010.”

The board is made up of the following individuals: Jack Kapica, Andrew Waitman, Jen Evans, Kerry Munro and Dr. Michael Geist.

Digital Journal is currently exploring syndication and strategic partnership opportunities, as the company is often approached by organizations looking to tap into the growing citizen journalism field.

Recognized as a pioneer in the citizen-media industry, Digital Journal is often praised for its quality reportage and unique approach to citizen journalism. Journalists are paid for their work through a unique revenue-sharing program. They are taught how to report news, and on-staff editors work hand-in-hand with reporters around the world to fact-check, verify and source stories.

For syndication, strategic partnership or investment opportunities, please contact Chris Hogg, CEO, Digital Journal Inc. // Website Contact // Tel: (416) 410-9675

About DigitalJournal.com: DigitalJournal.com is a citizen media site where writers from across the world work with seasoned professional reporters. The company has been recognized as a pioneer in citizen journalism, and the news reportage has been heralded as quality journalism. Contributors known as “Digital Journalists” work 24/7 to report news from multiple perspectives, while special attention is placed on quality and accuracy.


Digital Journal Board of Advisers:

Chairing the Board of Advisers is Jack Kapica, a journalist and editor with more than 40 years experience. Kapica has been a staff writer and editor for The Gazette in Montreal before moving to The Globe and Mail in 1975, where he edited a section of the paper devoted to popular culture.

Jack also contributed to Digital Journal magazine between 2001 and 2007. Over his years at the Globe, Jack contributed to virtually every beat from literary criticism to religion, news and technology. He has been Books Editor, editor of the Letters to the Editor page, and World Editor for the week-in-review Focus section.

In 1985, he published a collection of the best letters printed by the Globe, in a book called Shocked and Appalled: A Century of Letters to The Globe and Mail. Jack helped train Globe reporters when the newspaper became computerized in 1977, and purchased his first computer in 1981.

From 1996 to 1999, Jack wrote many high-tech features as well as a weekly column called Cyberia for the print paper. He also regularly reviewed new products and software.

In 2001, he became the lead technology columnist and reporter for the technology section of the paper’s website, globeandmail.com.

Jack left the Globe in 2008.


Andrew Waitman is Chief Executive Officer of Pythian and Managing Partner of Blackswan Ventures, an angel technology investment firm.

From 1996 to 2008, Andrew was the Managing Partner of Celtic House Venture Partners, the largest and most successful IT venture fund in Canada, with more than $500-million under management.

He has been involved with more than 75 start-ups and a board member of more than 25 technology start-ups. His current boards include Fidus Systems and Pythian. Andrew has previously served on the boards of DNA13, Third Brigade, ModaSolutions, Diablo Technologies, Overlay.TV, TrialStat, Memsic (IPO on Nasdaq), Sandvine (IPO on TSE), OctigaBay (acquired by Cray), FastLane Technologies (acquired by Quest Software), Pixstream (acquired by Cisco), Abatis (acquired by Redback), OLAP@Work (acquired by Business Objects), BlueArc, Avesta Technologies (acquired by Visual Networks), Orchestream (IPO on LSE) and Ubiquity Software (acquired by Avaya). He sits on the advisory Board of Genesys Capital and the volunteer Board of SHAD Valley. Prior to Celtic House Andrew held senior positions at Eagle & Partners (now Dundee Securities), Citibank and Nortel.

Andrew holds a Bachelor of Applied Science in Electrical Engineering from the University of Waterloo and an MBA with distinction from the Richard Ivey School of Business. He is a Chartered Financial Analyst and a member of the Association of Professional Engineers of Ontario.


Jen Evans is the founder and chief strategist at Sequentia Environics, a customer communications agency ranked as Canada’s 24th (2005) and 27th (2004) fastest-growing emerging company by PROFIT magazine.

She joined the board of ITAC in 2009 and has been the co-chair of the White Ribbon CampaignPCworld.ca and was a contributor to The Globe and Mail‘s online tech edition for seven years. since 2005, and also sits on RedFlagDeals’ advisory board. Jen writes a column on business and technology for

Jen has been talking tech on BNN (formerly Report on Business Television) since 1999, and appears in the Technology in the Workplace segment on Workopolis.tv. Jen and Sequentia Environics are pioneers in the world of community and social media, developing revenue-focused social content programs as far back as 1999.

They developed their first community program for Intel in 2004, and current social media and community clients include Yahoo!, TD Canada Trust, Palm, Coca-Cola Canada, Autodesk, and Bell Enterprise. Sequentia Environics’ groundbreaking social measurement methodology, based on customer ethnography, analytics and primary research, has helped more than 40 enterprises establish their social and community strategy and measure success.


Kerry Munro is former head of Yahoo! Canada. Over the past two decades Kerry has led and advised organizations on how to experience hyper growth by leveraging consumer behaviour and demystifying technology as a means to connect with consumers, build a digital brand, and increase revenues and shareholder value.

Recently he was the head of Yahoo! Canada, where it became the fastest-growing and best-performing business unit in Yahoo! worldwide, achieving annual double-to-triple-digit growth over four years and creating connections with more than 19 million Canadians monthly.

Kerry has been recognized as one of Canada’s top influential marketers. He advises executives, boards, growth companies and charitable organizations, and is sought after contributor to national news organizations.


Dr. Michael Geist is a professor of law at the University of Ottawa, where he holds the Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law.

Michael is an internationally syndicated columnist on technology law issues with his regular column appearing in the Toronto Star, Ottawa Citizen, and the BBC. Michael serves on the Privacy Commissioner of Canada’s Expert Advisory Board, on the Canadian Digital Information Strategy’s Review Panel, the Electronic Frontier Foundation Advisory Board, and on the Information Program Sub-Board of the Open Society Institute.

Michael has received numerous awards for his work including the Les Fowlie Award for Intellectual Freedom from the Ontario Library Association in 2009; the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Pioneer Award in 2008; Canarie’s IWAY Public Leadership Award for his contribution to the development of the Internet in Canada; and he was named one of Canada’s Top 40 Under 40 in 2003.